2017 Environment Award for Children’s Literature Shortlist Announced

2017 Environment Award for Children’s Literature Shortlist Announced

The following is the shortlist for the EACL awards, supported by The Wilderness Society.

Please click here for more information. The winners will be announced in Melbourne on the 12th of August.

Picture fiction

Circle by Jeannie Baker

Tiny godwit birds follow ancient, invisible pathways in an infinity of sky. Flying on and on, for nine nights and nine days, flying without rest. From Arctic icebergs in the north, to tropical golden beaches in the south, across thousands of kilometres of Pacific Ocean. ‘Circle’ captures the sheer wonder of this migratory journey, reminding us of the global interdependence of nature. The Godwit’s remarkable flight is followed as it comes full circle … back to the place where mud and sand become sea.

 

 

The Cassowary’s Gift by Pam Skadins and Kathryn Lovejoy

There’s a buzz in the rainforest after the animals start seeing new signs about the cassowary. But why is the cassowary so important? Join the rainforest animals as they search for the cassowary and hear his special song about his gift to the forest…

 

 

 

 

Echidnas Can’t Cuddle by Nieta Manser and Lauren Merrick

Erik the echidna is feeling sad. His quills make it hard to cuddle his family and friends – nobody likes a spiky hug! But when a few things go astray, Erik finds that his prickly exterior can come in very handy…

 

 

 

 

Chooks in Dinner Suits by Diane Jackson Hill and Craig Smith

On a tiny island lives a waddle of Little Penguins. But their numbers are dwindling. Swampy Marsh knows what to do, but no one will listen. Soon he can count the last few penguins on the fingers of one hand. The desperate townsfolk give Swampy, and his friends Max and Mimi, one chance. A warmly funny account of one man’s quest to save a penguin colony, with two very unusual helpers.

 

 

Non-fiction

Amazing Animals of Australia’s National Parks by Gina M. Newton

With its enticing and colourful design and its fascinating information, this is a book that children will want to pore over-either at home, in the classroom or on a road trip. This book brings together 55 national parks, selected across all Australian states and territories, and over 120 animals. It is divided into seven sections according to habitat (woodlands and grasslands; forests; rainforests; arid zones; mountains; wetlands and waterways; coasts, oceans and islands), each including a number of national parks and a selection of the fish, reptiles, frogs, birds and mammals that inhabit them. At the end of the book is a section on ‘little critters’-beetles, spiders, butterflies, grasshoppers, bugs and so on. Each habitat section opens with photographs of the featured national parks and a description of the habitat. Each animal has its own page, which has a stunning colour photograph of the species, a map of its distribution range, its conservation status and scientific information about the species. The information is divided into the following sections: ‘Fast Facts’ gives you all the vital statistics, such as size, lifespan and number of young; ‘Where Does It Live?‘ tells you where in Australia you can find the species and provides details about its home; ‘What’s Its Life Like?’ tells you a bit about how the animal moves, behaves, eats and has young; and ‘Interesting Info’ has quirky and fascinating facts.

Welcome to Country by Aunty Joy Murphy and Lisa Kennedy

This is an expansive and generous Welcome to Country from a most respected Elder, Aunty Joy Murphy, beautifully given form by Indigenous artist Lisa Kennedy. Welcome to the traditional lands of the Wurundjeri People. We are part of this land and the land is part of us. This is where we come from. Wominjeka Wurundjeri balluk yearmenn koondee bik. Welcome to Country.

 

 

 

Desert Lake by Pamela Freeman and Liz Anelli

The dry salt bed of Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre shimmers in the desert heat. But far up north, the rains have come. Water is flooding into empty riverbeds and swirling down towards the lake. Soon everything will change.

Fiction

Red-tail Recovery by Emma Homes

Ruthie’s wildlife scientist parents are taking on a new challenge – saving the endangered red-tailed black-cockatoo. For Ruthie this means a lot of exciting firsts: living in a house, and not a bus, starting at a ‘real’ school, and the chance to make some friends. As always, Ruthie will be helping her parents with their work, but will it be enough to make a difference for these rare and beautiful birds? And what will Ruthie and her family find themselves up against this time?

 

 

 

Rainforest Camp: Juliet Nearly a Vet by Rebecca Johnson

Hi! I’m Juliet. I’m ten years old. And I’m nearly a vet! We’re off on a school camp to the rainforest. Chelsea, Maisy and I are excited about all the different animals we might spot on our nature walks and torchlight treks. Chelsea is NOT excited about the creepy crawlies we might find! I’ve brought my vet-kit along just in case we find any animals in need of help . . .

Squishy Taylor and the Tunnel of Doom by Ailsa Wild and Ben Wood

Sita ‘Squishy’ Taylor is a cheeky, sneaky 11-year-old who lives with her dad and step-family in a very crowded apartment. Luckily for Squishy, their building is huge – and there’s always plenty of mysteries to investigate! Like…

  1. Why are tunnels be both exciting and scary?
  2. How do dogs always know who the bad guys are?
  3. Why are pinkie-swears so important?
  4. Who’s storing toxic waste under the park?

A hilarious junior fiction book series from Australian author Ailsa Wild about solving mysteries, blending families and leaping to conclusions quicker than a ninja-gazelle!