10 Great Science Books for Kids

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Special thanks to Charlotte and Phil at ReadItDaddy who put together this list of 10 Great Science Books for Kids. We will endeavour to feature these great books over the coming weeks. Make sure you take the time to check out their great blog!

Over at ReadItDaddy you’ll notice that we talk about science a lot, particularly when we find great books that can engage children in the magic of science, bringing innovative ideas forward so that a whole new generation of chemists, physicists, biologists, astronomers and space geeks are inspired and enthralled.

We’ve come up with a list of ten children’s titles that we rate very highly (many of them have won our prestigious “Book of the Week” awards on the blog.

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Without further ado – here’s our top ten science book list.

astronauts-handbook1. The Astronaut’s Handbook by Louie Stowell with foreword by Tim Peake

This is utterly essential reading for any would-be astronaut, featuring tons and tons of facts and figures all about space and the people who work, explore and experiment there. Have you got what it takes to become an astronaut and cosmonaut? Find out if you’re made of the right stuff in this brilliant pocket-sized book.

 

 

 

100-things-to-know-about-science2. 100 Things to Know about Science

Packing in an absolute TON of different subject, “100 Things to Know about Science” is a fabulous reference book split between various different sciences, with lots of brilliant exploration of the history of science as well as contemporary subjects too. You’ll see Usborne feature a lot in our list – mostly because they produce incredible books like this that engage children’s interest with fabulous presentation, illustration and text.

 

 

 

rebel-science3. Rebel Science by Dan Green and David Lyttleton

Can scientists be akin to rock stars and celebrities? This book shows how some of the most brilliant (and sometimes some of the most flawed) ideas in science came from true science rebels, who quite often came up with wild and crazy theories and experiments to back up their research. Utterly fascinating, with some really great illustrations of everyone from Edison to Tesla, from Curie to Einstein, to underpin the humorous text.

 

 

how-things-work4. How Things Work: Facts and fun, questions and answers, things to make and do by Okido Magazine

This book is fantastic for teeny weeny scientists who are just beginning to find out more about their world. Along with a gallant band of curious little folk, kids will learn about all sorts of machines and mechanisms, and the science behind everyday things that make our lives more convenient. Best of all, the book takes great care to introduce green matters to children, ensuring youngsters know the importance of looking after our planet.

5. ABC Universe by the American Museum of Natural History

To infinity and beyond with an absolutely fascinating alphabet book that reaches out into the stars and into the universe, perfect for little space cadets. Bold photographic illustrations capture every object, ensuring children learning their letters will have plenty to look at.

6. The Amazing Human Body Detectives by Maggie Li  

A brilliant biology book this time, with an innovative magnifying glass so that children can really get up close and examine all the interesting and intricate bits that make up our bodies. Get up close and personal with cells and germs, with tons of excellent illustrations perfectly designed for piquing children’s curiosity.

7. Laika the Astronaut by Owen Davy

A truly awesome version of the story of Laika, one of the first animals in space. Laika was a stray Russian dog before she was adopted by space scientists and trained to be fired aboard a rocket into space. Laika survived blast-off but you’ll need to read this book to find out what happened to her as she entered orbit. Owen Davy may take a wee liberty or two with the real story but it’s a great jumping off point for children who want to find out more about the first faltering steps the human (and canine) race took into space.

8. Professor Astro Cat’s Frontiers of Space by Dr Dominic Walliman and Ben Newman

Another utterly astonishing look at our solar system through the eyes of intrepid space explorer Professor Astro Cat. Along with his animal friends he explores the star at the centre of our solar system (the sun) and all the planets, and what we could expect to find there if we jetted off in our spaceships for a visit. Innovative illustrations and presentation make this a truly standout space title for kids.

9. See Inside your Head by Alex Frith and Colin King

The intricacies of your brain are explored in this fabulous lift-the-flap book, perfect for exercising the old grey matter with loads of facts and figures about the contents of our skulls. How does the brain interpret signals from our limbs and organs? Why do we dream (and how do we dream!) Why do we experience pain? What happens when the brain doesn’t work as it should? It’s all in this truly amazing book.

night-sky-watcher10. Night Sky Watcher by Raman Prinja  

If you’re lucky enough to live somewhere where you can truly explore the clear night sky and spot all the stars and constellations up there, here’s a great zip-up waterproof book perfect for nocturnal trips out into the wilds so that you can get a better uninterrupted view of the night sky. Find out how the sky changes as the year progresses, and quickly learn how to find out where stars and planets are, no matter which direction you look in.

We hope you like our selection of brilliant science books for children. Find these, and a whole lot more, on our blog http://readitdaddy.blogspot.com.

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