Mendeleev on the Periodic Law: Selected Writings, 1869 – 1905

Mendeleev on the Periodic Law: Selected Writings, 1869 – 1905 by Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, Edited by William B. Jensen 

Synopsis: By the dawn of the nineteenth century, “elements” had been defined as basic building blocks of nature resistant to decomposition by chemical means. In 1869, the Russian chemist Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev organized the discord of the elements into the periodic table, assigning each element to a row, with each row corresponding to an elemental category. The underlying order of matter, hitherto only dimly perceived, was suddenly clearly revealed.

This is the first English-language collection of Mendeleev’s most important writings on the periodic law. Thirteen papers and essays, divided into three groups, reflect the period corresponding to the initial establishment of the periodic law (three papers: 1869-71), a period of priority disputes and experimental confirmations (five papers: 1871-86), and a final period of general acceptance for the law and increasing international recognition for Mendeleev (five papers: 1887-1905). A single, easily accessible source for Mendeleev’s principle papers, this volume offers a history of the development of the periodic law, written by the law’s own founder.

Published: December 2005 | ISBN: 978-0486445717

Author’s mini-bio: Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev was a Russian chemist and inventor. He formulated the Periodic Law, created his own version of the periodic table of elements, and used it to correct the properties of some already discovered elements and also to predict the properties of eight elements yet to be discovered. – Wikipedia

Journal of Chemical Education Book Review

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Paperback Edition: Mendeleev on the Periodic Law: Selected Writings, 1869 – 1905 (Dover Books on Chemistry)
Kindle Edition: Mendeleev on the Periodic Law: Selected Writings, 1869 – 1905 (Dover Books on Chemistry)

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