Bad Pharma: How drug companies mislead doctors and harm patients

Bad-Pharma

By Ben Goldacre

Synopsis: 

Medicine is broken. We like to imagine that it’s based on evidence and the results of fair tests. In reality, those tests are often profoundly flawed.

We like to imagine that doctors are familiar with the research literature surrounding a drug, when in reality much of the research is hidden from them by drug companies. We like to imagine that doctors are impartially educated, when in reality much of their education is funded by industry. We like to imagine that regulators let only effective drugs onto the market, when in reality they approve hopeless drugs, with data on side effects casually withheld from doctors and patients.

All these problems have been protected from public scrutiny because they’re too complex to capture in a sound bite. But Dr. Ben Goldacre shows that the true scale of this murderous disaster fully reveals itself only when the details are untangled. He believes we should all be able to understand precisely how data manipulation works and how research misconduct on a global scale affects us. In his own words, “the tricks and distortions docu- mented in these pages are beautiful, intricate, and fascinating in their details.” Bad Pharma reveals a shockingly broken system and calls for something to be done. This is the pharmaceutical industry as it has never been seen before.

Published: September, 2012 | ISBN-13: 978-0007350742

Author’s Blog: http://www.badscience.net
Authors Twitter: https://twitter.com/bengoldacre

“Being informed is an important part of a functioning democracy. It is even more important for a well oiled healthcare system. Bad Pharma shines a harsh spotlight on the gross inadequacies in the current arrangement. Weaknesses in regulatory structures, experimental methods and oversight, ghost writing, conflicts of interests and much more. If you’re at all interested in what sort of medical treatment you and your family receive it is a must read.” Warren, @embiggenbooks

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Categories: Culture, Pharmacology, Society

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